Energy East Pipeline to Nova Scotia: Will First Nations Have a Big Say?

Posted by Don Richardson

on Dec 9, 2016 9:25:34 AM


 

By Don Richardson, Managing Partner, Shared Value Solutions Ltd.

INTRODUCTION:

I was taken by surprise by the announcement that Nova Scotia's Strait of Canso Superport should be an ultimate destination for the Energy East pipeline.  That's the recommendation of a new Senate Committee report released on December 7th, 2016.  The report also highlights the Indigenous partnering, including benefit sharing and equity stakes, that the Senate Committee says are critical for any Canadian oil transportation strategy.  

At Shared Value Solutions we provide environmental and regulatory consulting support for several First Nation clients across New Brunswick, Prince Edward Island and Nova Scotia.  This new report from the Senate Committee on Transport and Communications has big implications for our clients, and will lead to important community decisions.  And it is part of a constantly changing and complex political story that is Energy East.  

Part of my job, which I couldn't do without my terrific colleagues, is to support Indigenous leaders and their communities, in getting the facts, conducting independent due diligence including land use and Indigenous knowledge studies, and making informed community decisions.

The Senate report, is largely supportive of Canadian oil and gas energy production policies and should be read with that understanding.  It is titled Pipelines for Oil: Protecting our economy, respecting our environment and makes 6 key points about a proposal to direct the Energy East oil pipeline to a new port in Nova Scotia.  Let's see what this means...

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Topics: Energy East, Pipelines

Indigenous Commercial Fisheries - the Next Reconciliation Revolution

Posted by Don Richardson

on Dec 3, 2016 11:27:08 PM


 

INTRODUCTION:

David Suzuki recently wrote an article titled Reconciliation Requires Recognizing Rights-Based Fishing.  It got us thinking about the range of recent work we've been doing with clients around Indigenous fisheries - everything from connecting Saugeen Ojibway Nation fisheries representatives  to Guelph's Neighbourhood Group of restaurants to explore supply-chain opportunities, to helping the Mi'kmaq Confederacy of PEI with regulatory comments on the review of the federal Fisheries Act, to working with the Qikiqtarjuaq ("Qik") community of Nunavut on its growing commercial fishery, to assisting Aroland First Nation and Matawa Four Rivers with efforts to protect endangered sturgeon habitat and spawning areas.

Suzuki really got us thinking about the connections between Reconciliation and fish, especially as we work with clients on restoring lost protections and introducing Indigenous safeguards to the Federal Fisheries Act.  Here are 5 key points that Suzuki makes, and our follow-on comments:

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Topics: Traditional Knowledge and Land Use Studies, Aboriginal Land and Water Stewards, Indigenous Knowledge and Climate Change