Eagle Eye Digest: Climate change funding, Qikiqtani Inuit Apology, and Investments in the Far North

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Read on for updates on Indigenous funding programs, precedent setting impact benefit and resource management agreements, and stories of prosperity, jurisdiction and stewardship in action. 

 

Indigenous Prosperity

With Tallurutiup Imanga marine conservation area comes $55M for Inuit communities

Prime Minister Justin Trudeau recently announced $54.8 million for Inuit in five communities on Baffin Island tied to the completion of Tallurutiup Imanga as a marine conservation area. The money will create training programs for Inuit to take on conservation and research jobs, and look at developing fisheries and small craft harbours in or around the conservation area.  Nearly $2 million from the agreement will go to help the five communities' hunters and trappers organizations so they can participate in conservation efforts and wildlife management. For the president of the Qikiqtani Inuit Association (QIA) PJ Akeeagok, this is what's important. "Inuit will have the tools, such as the jobs, the training facilities to be able to do the important work of being truly the eyes and ears of Tallurutiup Imanga," Akeeagok said. 

 

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Ottawa gives $21.5 million to Kitikmeot Inuit road and port project

The federal government is committing $21.5 million to the Kitikmeot Inuit Association’s to get the Grays Bay Road and Port project “shovel ready” over the next couple of years. The funding announcement for the initiative, which is expected to make Nunavut mining projects more economical and potentially reduce cost for community resupply, came this past Tuesday in Iqaluit. Federal Minister of Transport Marc Garneau was on hand for the occasion. Nunavut Tunngavik Inc. (NTI) had already announced that it would give $7.25 million to the initiative.

 

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Indigenous Stewardship

Funding Alert: Indigenous Community-based Climate Monitoring Program 

This program provides funding to support Indigenous peoples in the design, implementation, or expansion of long-term community-based climate monitoring projects. Specifically, the program supports community-led projects to monitor climate and the environmental effects of climate change on traditional lands and waters. The program also facilitates access to tools and best practices, enhances collaboration and coordination among initiatives, and supports Indigenous participation in program oversight. The program also supports meeting the needs identified by Indigenous partners through engagement on the Pan-Canadian Framework on Clean Growth and Climate Change. Funding applications for the 2019-2020 fiscal yer are open to Inuit communities only. There is no application deadline but is first come, first serve until funding is maxed out.

 

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Funding Alert: Climate Change and Health Adaptation Program for First Nations South of 60

There is a new climate change adaptation funding program that has become available. The funding supports projects focusing on human health and climate change with specific focus on integrating Indigenous Knowledge, youth engagement and/or training. Applications are due September 20, 2019 and they will fund up to $100,000 per project per year (funding is for projects that run from April 1, 2020 to March 31, 2021).

 

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Looking for support with either of these Climate Change funding programs? Contact us, we'd love to help you out!

 

Indigenous Jurisdiction

Summer Listening: Gwayakotam Podcast - Episode 1

We are super pleased to announce that the first episode of a new podcast, gwayakotam (listening to the truth), is ready for your listening pleasure! And what better time than summer to kick back and listen to the very real, very inspiring stories of a First Nation in northern Ontario called Aroland? Gwayakotam is a podcast series and community art project that explores the intersection between traditional stories that have been passed down through generations and the contemporary experiences of Aroland First Nation community members with the reconciliation process in Canada. This podcast was generously supported by Canada Council for the Arts.

 

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Apology to Qikiqtani Inuit leaves QIA president filled with hope

Carolyn Bennett, the minister of Crown-Indigenous relations and northern affairs, delivered the apology on August 14 in Iqaluit, along with announcements of $20 million in financial commitments aimed at helping the Inuit of the Qikiqtani region start the process of healing from the traumas of the modern-day colonial period.

These traumas were documented by the Qikiqtani Truth Commission, an Inuit-run body that from 2007 to 2010 gathered evidence from 345 witnesses at 16 public hearings held throughout the region, along with extensive archival research. The Commission's findings were documents in the commission’s main report “Achieving Saimaqatigiingniq,”which represents the idea of a new relationship, “when past opponents get back together, meet in the middle, and are at peace.” And to get there, the QTC made 25 recommendations, most aimed at the federal government, divided into four themes: acknowledging and healing past wrongs, strengthening Inuit governance, strengthening Inuit culture, and creating healthy communities. But QIA President, PJ Akeeagok said that can’t start without the first step: acknowledging and healing past wrongs, which is why the apology is the most important part of the package.

 

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About Us: Shared Value Solutions

We are a Canadian B Corp, and we assist Indigenous communities with support throughout regulatory processes surrounding major development projects like mines, hydroelectric facilities, transmission lines, highway expansions, oil and gas pipelines, natural resource transport applications and nuclear power. 

 

We have deep context and experience behind the recommendations we provide, having worked for our clients on almost every major project in Canada over the last 10 years. For us, it’s all about building long-term relationships with our clients. We want to get to know you and what you want to do so we can help you move your plans forward. 

 

 

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