Traditional Knowledge Interview Training: Anishinabek/Ontario Fisheries Resource Centre

Posted by Jessica Steiner

on May 9, 2017 10:09:09 AM

Thanks to to the Anishinabek/Ontario Fisheries  Resource Centre for inviting us to facilitate Indigenous Traditional Knowledge Interview Training in North Bay, Ontario. Our team members had a great time connecting with the AOFRC staff and representatives from 12 different First Nation communities from all over Ontario. Indigenous knowledge matters, and capacity building in Aboriginal communities for traditional knowledge gathering and documenting is very important.  Check out the video below.

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Topics: Traditional Knowledge in Environmental Assessments, Traditional Knowledge and Land Use Studies, training, Capcity Building

Community Cultural Values Mapping: Does it Work?

Posted by Jessica Steiner

on Jan 9, 2017 2:49:18 PM

Community Values Mapping sessions allow for more participants to be involved in Indigenous Knowledge studies and for new stories and perspectives to be brought to the table.

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Topics: Traditional Knowledge and Land Use Studies

Indigenous Commercial Fisheries - the Next Reconciliation Revolution

Posted by Don Richardson

on Dec 3, 2016 11:27:08 PM


 

INTRODUCTION:

David Suzuki recently wrote an article titled Reconciliation Requires Recognizing Rights-Based Fishing.  It got us thinking about the range of recent work we've been doing with clients around Indigenous fisheries - everything from connecting Saugeen Ojibway Nation fisheries representatives  to Guelph's Neighbourhood Group of restaurants to explore supply-chain opportunities, to helping the Mi'kmaq Confederacy of PEI with regulatory comments on the review of the federal Fisheries Act, to working with the Qikiqtarjuaq ("Qik") community of Nunavut on its growing commercial fishery, to assisting Aroland First Nation and Matawa Four Rivers with efforts to protect endangered sturgeon habitat and spawning areas.

Suzuki really got us thinking about the connections between Reconciliation and fish, especially as we work with clients on restoring lost protections and introducing Indigenous safeguards to the Federal Fisheries Act.  Here are 5 key points that Suzuki makes, and our follow-on comments:

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Topics: Traditional Knowledge and Land Use Studies, Aboriginal Land and Water Stewards, Indigenous Knowledge and Climate Change

Apply NOW: 6 Steps to Apply to the Aboriginal Fund for Species at Risk

Posted by Trieneke Gastmeier and Don Richardson

on Dec 9, 2015 4:26:35 PM


Check Your Pocket

The Caribou has been a Canadian icon since appearing on our quarters in 1936. But the Caribou on your quarter is in trouble in many parts of Canada, especially where their forest habitat is disturbed or fragmented.  

The Aboriginal Fund for Species at Risk (AFSAR) call for proposals is now open.  The program will be accepting Expressions of Interest until December 18th, 2015. The submission of an Expression of Interest is strongly encouraged, particularly for applicants who have not received AFSAR funding in the past or for those applying to a new stream.  The deadline for proposal submissions is January 15th, 2016.  Below, we provide six key steps for creating an AFSAR application.

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Topics: BEAHR Training, Traditional Knowledge in Environmental Assessments, Traditional Knowledge and Land Use Studies, Aboriginal Land and Water Stewards

Archaeology and Indigenous Rights and Interests

Posted by Trieneke Gastmeier

on Nov 25, 2015 2:58:10 PM


Archaeology and Indigenous Rights: Mississaugas of the New Credit First Nation community member Carolyn King (left) monitoring an archaeological assessment in the Greater Toronto Area with Shared Value Solutions Archaeologist, Trieneke Gastmeier (right, facing camera)

Who owns the past? Who should have the right (ethically or otherwise) to dig it up?  These are important questions one must consider when working in the field of archaeology.

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Topics: Traditional Knowledge in Environmental Assessments, Traditional Knowledge and Land Use Studies, Aboriginal and Industry Partnerships

Aboriginal Edge: Confrontation OR Aboriginal and Industry Partnerships

Posted by Don Richardson

on Aug 19, 2015 2:14:00 PM

The Canadian Chamber of Commerce says collaboration with Aboriginal communities is key in natural resource development.

 

The Canadian Chamber of Commerce recently published a report on one of the most critical issues facing Canada's natural resources sector: engaging and involving the First Nation, Inuit and Métis communities that live near or on the land where projects operate.  The report is titled Aboriginal Edge: How Aboriginal Peoples and Natural Resource Businesses Are Forging a New Competitive Advantage.  

Aboriginal and Industry Partnerships

There is a strong trend toward collaborative Aboriginal and industry partnerships.  It's not always easy to move collaboration forward, but the trend is real.  Despite much of what we may see and hear in the media about confrontational relationships between industry and  First Nation, Inuit and Métis communities, the reality behind the scenes is that there is a trend toward constructive dialogue, efforts at collaborative planning, and successful collaborations.  The Canadian Chamber of Commerce Report will help make it clear that constructive dialogue, collaboration and partnering is the "new normal" in Canada.  We couldn't agree more.

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Topics: Unconventional Oil and Gas, Traditional Knowledge in Environmental Assessments, Mining, Traditional Knowledge and Land Use Studies, Aboriginal and Industry Partnerships, Aboriginal Energy Projects, Pipelines

Reflections on the Yata Kati Traditional Knowledge Conference

Posted by Frances Dietrich-O'Connor

on Oct 24, 2014 1:33:00 PM

Last month I had the honour of attending the Yata Kati Traditional Knowledge Conference in Yellowknife. If you were there, we were the ones interviewing people on their thoughts about the conference and what traditional knowledge means to them. Stay tuned for a video which brings together clips from these interviews.

There were many insightful speakers at the conference whose work and words had a strong impact on how I view my work. Here are some of my key take-away points:

Dr. Suzanne Stewart spoke about her work on indigenous education and mental health. One of Suzanne’s quotes that stuck with me was that, to her, “indigenous knowledge is spiritual. It's about what you learn from having your feet on the ground.”

Dr. George Dei spoke about his work in the areas of anti-racism education, indigenous knowledges and anti-colonial thought. George’s assertion that “We need to challenge an insistence on a grand narrative about indigeneity” has made me reflect on the work I do. Working with indigenous communities on traditional land use studies (often related to natural resource development), there is an inherent bias in the focus of my work on the importance of the harvesting and land use for the communities we work with. I am aware, however, that I need to take steps to avoid unconsciously perpetuating grand narratives and to recognize and celebrate the myriad “indigeneities” that are present in each of the communities I work in.
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Topics: Traditional Knowledge in Environmental Assessments, Traditional Knowledge and Land Use Studies

Traditional Ecological Knowledge Stories from the Field: An e-postcard home

Posted by Leah Culver

on Oct 16, 2014 11:04:00 AM

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Topics: Traditional Knowledge in Environmental Assessments, Traditional Knowledge and Land Use Studies

Get Upstream to Protect Culturally Significant Areas Through the New Mining Act

Posted by Scott Mackay, Managing Partner and CEO/CFO

on Mar 5, 2013 8:26:00 AM

 

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Topics: Traditional Knowledge in Environmental Assessments, Mining, Sustainability Innovation in Ontario, Traditional Knowledge and Land Use Studies

Follow the Money, Follow e3 Plus:

Posted by admin

on Mar 1, 2013 12:45:00 PM

 

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Topics: Mining, Traditional Knowledge and Land Use Studies